Will the Eruption of Sierra Lavinuca Cause More Airport Closures?

Written by: Stephane Coffey Image: La Palma Airport. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons When volcano erupts, airports close, and vice versa. Of course airports and the air traffic that passes through them are one of …

Written by: Stephane Coffey

Image: La Palma Airport. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

When volcano erupts, airports close, and vice versa. Of course airports and the air traffic that passes through them are one of the most robust, battle-hardened armaments of any nation, but sometimes a volcano can wreak havoc on infrastructure far outside its immediate safety zone. La Palma, on the Canary Island of La Palma (Andalusia is the other region in the Canary Islands), is being told to expect strong winds tomorrow that will create “an ash cloud reaching 2,000 kilometers” (1,180 miles). This ash could result in flight cancellations, and if anything is bad for flying, some volcanoes in the air below are better. This explosion of an erupting volcano last week has whipped up winds along the southern coast of France – and that caused a communication breakdown between airports along that route.

As a result of the ash cloud there have been a number of cancellations and delays on French flights along the southern coast. Airlines have been speaking with French airports, warning that they may face similar phenomena throughout today and tomorrow. More countries have issued ash warnings (Spain’s Canary Islands have already been warned to expect almost 300 flight cancellations tonight, Europe’s main Air Traffic Organization (EASA) and the Central Organization for Civil Aviation (Oncaero) has issued an alert of “very strong” weather conditions.

In January, 2010, Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull volcano spewed thick clouds of ash – and resulting disruptions – all across Europe, as passengers and business people across the continent found themselves stranded on the ground.

Leave a Comment