Hunger fighting: is the C-virus vaccine dangerous?

If you have a bit of Christmas turkey leftovers on Christmas Day, we may have something to tell you about. Lots of you may have heard that the COPV-19 vaccine is being rolled out for …

If you have a bit of Christmas turkey leftovers on Christmas Day, we may have something to tell you about. Lots of you may have heard that the COPV-19 vaccine is being rolled out for people over the age of 50, even as the deadline for first children’s inoculations looms.

It is a developed from the discovery of the vaccine-resistant herpes virus, COPV, developed by the team from the Universities of Nottingham and Oxford, and it has been patented to Nizam’s Pharma.

While COPV has not been traditionally considered a threat to the human public, the vaccine’s manufacturer denies claims by various sceptics that it could promote wildland animal pyrolysis, and, as one retailer put it, cause the “mark of the beast”.

The manufacturer of the COPV-19 vaccine stresses that this is not the case.

And, as a precautionary measure, at no time have they stated to consumers that they have vaccinated for wildland pyrolysis (WYM).

Pyrolysis is the process of burning wood, in which the immediate oxygen supply is depleted, but most trees retain their hard outer covering.

The toxin release is equivalent to a partial hydrogen burn, involving the destruction of the core of the wood – so that includes the photosynthetic epithelium, the roots, and the topsoil.

So, without ventilation and other factors, in a large fire the chemical reaction would result in lung damage.

As well as having an increased risk of respiratory problems, pyrolysis would also cause increases in lung pressure, which would restrict breathing.

The fight against COPV

It has been a long and largely frustrating fight to stop the spread of this virus. Fortunately, the vaccine (COPV-19) developed has the ability to recognise the structure of this virus, and to express its protein.

This means it can be very specific to this virus.

As a result, according to COPV-19 World Wide pre-clinical animal studies show the vaccine produces effective immune responses to the virus.

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