COVID-19, the brain stimulator that blows out your migraines

If you are uncomfortable having a brain implant that looks like a very small, very convincing overgrown Bluetooth headset in your head, or the surgery that leads to that implant, or the pain that long-term …

If you are uncomfortable having a brain implant that looks like a very small, very convincing overgrown Bluetooth headset in your head, or the surgery that leads to that implant, or the pain that long-term use of that implant can bring – no fear! COVID-19 is about to make your life better.The latest COVID-19, which was shown to reduce headaches in the FDA-approved trials, was renamed as LUVO-19 at the ADEFAC meeting.LUVO-19 was shown to help seniors, other people who suffered from disabling migraines and other patients with Parkinson’s disease. The latest plan is to adapt it to this larger patient group.The delivery system, which is actually a transdermal patch, is a common one. It makes a constant current of electrical impulses, allowing the patient to reroute brain signals that cause headaches by releasing medication in other regions of the brain. Previously, there was only some evidence it would help older people with migraines.The evidence, which was shown in early trials, led the FDA to approve it for that group. Now, they will reexamine the benefits for treating a broader array of migraines. Some of the headaches in that population are so severe that drug treatment just isn’t tolerated, says William Paige, president of the American Academy of Neurology.In the FDA panel, several panel members were concerned about doses used in the trials. FDA officials told the physicians, neurologists and others who gathered to hear their thoughts on COVID-19 that they want to see lower doses in trial trials – meaning, lower than what was used in the research – which could be done by reducing the application size or size of the patch, or by adding a new delivery system.But Paige, a doctor in Detroit, who was in the study group that saw the patch reduced migraines for some, says that the notion of a patch size reduction is silly.The idea that the right size would be 1/3 or 1/4 the size of the patch is ludicrous, he says.And, he points out, it isn’t uncommon for people to get headaches during surgery, or long periods of being without sleep.”There’s no mechanism by which reducing the size of the patch will lower [the amount of] medication the body is missing,” Paige says.The FDA should make sure that when lowering doses they also remove those who would have to take it.”The most important thing is to have the patients’ willingness to take COVID-19,” Paige said.

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