How to tweet the truth about eating out

Written by By Emma-Lou Chappell, CNN To some, they may just be a Twitter feed … but to others, they represent an ever-present source of heartbreak and a little known small minority. Cheeky Pokey tweets …

Written by By Emma-Lou Chappell, CNN

To some, they may just be a Twitter feed … but to others, they represent an ever-present source of heartbreak and a little known small minority.

Cheeky Pokey tweets about restaurants don’t necessarily mean you will get exactly what you ordered, or even end up eating the wrong stuff at all.

Either way, as well as trying not to get out-naked on your dinner date, you may well find that the iPhone or tablet being dragged into the world of dining has sent you into a state of mind inducing bile or outright depression.

Either way, if you’re struggling with how to gracefully eat your dinner in the midst of this sea of bad news, you’re not alone.

Emma-Lou Chappell, CNN

However, new apps now give diners a chance to stay updated on locations of genuine food injustices — and also remind you of the comfort and beauty of eating out.

They serve the crowd with food all the same

There are the proverbial cat-food blogs — you know, the ones where chefs enthusiastically provide tips and tricks on preparing delicious meals.

Unlike the cat-food blogs, however, the expert-led content on the Good Food Twitter feed provides a new dimension to dining as we know it, a supplement to your favorite social feeds that hopes to educate as well as inspire.

NewFeeds

These days, diners can search to save a lovely photo of a dish for later and share it with friends, via text or email. The Good Food Feeds is an app taking advantage of this, making it a great resource for those wanting to make sure they don’t eat the wrong thing.

The Feed allows a writer to post and edit posts in a way similar to Twitter, while also allowing visitors to explore the kind of stories, tips and photos on offer.

Eating too much, too soon?

Isolationism is, sadly, a common problem when it comes to eating out. Dating app Happn offers a place to plug in your location and look at other users in your area. When someone who shares your location arrives, you have the opportunity to block them by tapping a “Block” button.

If you’re an indecisive diner, this service may help you to decide.

MindMood

Depending on your mood, Tinder’s awesome, creepy icebreaker could help you out of a sticky situation.

But the other can also be far more sinister.

When it comes to further compounding your anxiety about eating out, dating app Hinge, which allows people to swipe through profiles of their potential matches, is another app which allows you to keep on eye on your immediate vicinity.

And wouldn’t you like to avoid the feeling of nauseous despair caused by a dozen cold fries that arrive at your table?

Online food delivery system JustEat has made this very job a lot easier with its excellent new app, Just Eat Market.

A virtual cupboard

To get an idea of what kind of alternative dining platforms have been popping up to add some extra energy to online dining and socializing, we’re sharing a few of our favorite examples here.

The pork Chorizo Nachos on offer at La Carne was a recommendation from Fear Not Coffee on their Twitter feed.

The restaurant’s Fear Not Coffee was happy to share a selection of photos from a reservation they made three months ago.

The Chorizo Nachos

Locally grown food

One key aspect of the new order of dining and socializing that we’re seeing right now is the growth of “delivery food” platforms, offering people the opportunity to buy food from local producers.

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